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I was in love with these photos and set out to get my brand-new CX-30 Turbo Premium (Soul Crystal Red) similarly blacked out.

Avery Dennison SW900 (gloss black, obviously) is one of the easiest and most forgiving vinyl wraps to work with. The chrome door trim should be easy to do, especially if you use knifeless tape. Doing that soon.

Today, I wrapped the roof rails and they look amazing. WAY cooler-looking than the factory polished aluminum. The cross-section of the rails is fairly complex though. I had to use various vinyl application tools and a heat gun to get a smooth finish with no air bubbles in the recessed channels. A single 12” x 60” roll cut into two 6” strips does both rails.

The chrome grill trim pieces might be tricky to wrap but I’m going to remove the whole front bumper to do that plus apply paint protection film (the whole front half of the car) along with tinting the headlights all at the same time

Just this February, Vvivid came out with their new “VViViD+ Ultimate Headlight Taillight Tint Vinyl Wrap (Light Smoke)" which appears to be a stellar product ($30 for the basic kit). Very stretchable and forgiving plus super high-gloss. I’ll use that on the front emblem also.

Vvivid’s older Tec R gloss carbon fiber wrap was previously part of their XPO line and it had a clear layer applied over regular faux carbon fiber. All such vinyls are prone to delaminating and will look like crap in less than a year. Fortunately, new for 2022, Vvivid reformulated their Tec R gloss carbon fiber with a solidly fused clearcoat which solves the delaminating problem. The new version is part of their Vvivid+ Plus line now and costs more but it’s worth it ($40 shipped for a 24” x 60” roll). I’m doing the rear spoiler and the two surrounding trim pieces in this vinyl because the black plastic there looks exactly like what it is - cheap black plastic.

The rear emblem and badges I’ll spray in Hyperdip (smoother and glossier than Plastidip but more expensive).

Additionally, I’m doing my brake calipers in bright yellow. I don’t understand why people try to paint brakes on the car - it’s just four bolts! With the caliper carriers free and the caliper bodies semi-detached, it’s much easier to do a thorough spray job. Being kind of a perfectionist, I’m taking the time to Dremel the rough sand-castings smooth (and to fill in the numbers and “MADE IN MEXICO” on each caliper with high-temp JB Weld). That takes many hours though so I’m chipping away at it a couple of hours at a time.

I’ve only had my car for three days so this all will take a minute to get done.
Heck yeah! Thank you for all the info and I can't wait to see what you end up with after all the work! It's gonna be sick!
 

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Man, it looks SOOO good! I just got my 30 over the weekend and I'm dying to do this stuff to it. Had you ever done vinyl work before doing the window sills? If not, how tricky was it and do you have any pointers? Also, what did you use to do the front emblem? Did it affect any of the driver assist sensors in the emblem? Hoping I can get mine looking as clean as yours!
I had never done vinyl work before and just watched a few videos on YouTube for pointers. My first attempt didn't go so well and I had to redo it, but after that it went pretty smoothly. I just used the blades included with the vinyl and trimmed it all by hand. The front emblem has 2 layers of tint, I believe it was 15 percent, but not entirely sure, I just know that one layer was not dark enough for me. That also too a couple attempts to get it right.
 

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I had never done vinyl work before and just watched a few videos on YouTube for pointers. My first attempt didn't go so well and I had to redo it, but after that it went pretty smoothly. I just used the blades included with the vinyl and trimmed it all by hand. The front emblem has 2 layers of tint, I believe it was 15 percent, but not entirely sure, I just know that one layer was not dark enough for me. That also too a couple attempts to get it right.
DIYAH 12 X 48 Inches Self Adhesive Headlight, Tail Lights, Fog Lights Tint Vinyl Film (Light Black) https://a.co/d/am8yMW9
 

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DIYAH 12 X 48 Inches Self Adhesive Headlight, Tail Lights, Fog Lights Tint Vinyl Film (Light Black) https://a.co/d/am8yMW9
Heck yeah! Thank you! This may be a dumb question, but I'm assuming you just applied the tint to the outside of the front emblem cover? Have you noticed it affect any of the sensors in there?
 

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... I'm assuming you just applied the tint to the outside of the front emblem cover? Have you noticed it affect any of the sensors in there?
It's worth mentioning here that there are different kinds of tinting film:
  • The earliest tinting films were dyed. They faded over time and tended to turn purple.
  • The next generation of tinting films were metallic. Color-stable but they interfered with in-vehicle electronics (radios and cell phones).
  • Then came carbon tinting films. Color-stable and no electronic issues but the size of the nano-particles contributes to a phenomenon known as "Low-Angle Haze" - a cloudy, milky appearance in strong sunlight. Better, more expensive carbon-based tinting films control LAH by using very small nano-particle sizes.
  • Today in 2022, the most popular tinting films are ceramic-based. These can have the same Low-Angle Haze issues as carbon-based tinting films. The justification for the higher cost of ceramic films is their relatively higher infrared rejection (and thus increased rejection of Total Solar Energy). Again, premium ceramic films minimize LAH thru smaller nano-particle sizes. Cheap tinting films (like Walmart's "Black Magic" product line - not sure if this is carbon-based or ceramic) have horrendous Low-Angle Haze - truly awful, so bad it should be illegal because of the way it negatively affects driver vision in bright sunlight.
  • 3M's current top-shelf tinting film "Crystaline" utilizes over 200-layers of ultra-thin optical film combined to provide amazing levels of infrared rejection even when the color tinting is virtually clear. It's a popular option for tinting windshields which is illegal in most U.S. states (and your insurer will not be happy if they discover a tinted windshield on your car after an at-fault accident). 3M Crystaline is often mistakenly referred to as a "ceramic film" but it's not really ceramic-based - instead, it's a unique film type not made by anyone else.
Bottom line; probably best not to tint your radar unit with an older, second-gen metallic tinting film. I have no idea what kind of tinting film DIYAH is (the product description doesn't say) but it's designed for headlights/taillights, not radar units. Personally, I'll be covering my radar unit (front emblem) with Vvivid's new "Ultimate" headlight/taillight product since that's what I have already for tinting my headlights/taillights. Again, not it's intended use and it costs $30 instead of just $7 for the DIYAH product.
 

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My own Bartman78 Chrome Delete is coming along. Three photos of my 2022 CX-30 Turbo Premium:
A. The day I got it (Tuesday, 5 days ago)
B. What it looked like this morning.
C. What it looks like tonight after reassembly with:
1. Vinyl-wrapped roof rails and chrome trim.
2. Light-smoke tinted headlights, turn-signals, and grill emblem (radar unit).
3. Paint Protection Film (PPF) on the front bumper and hood.

Man, PPF is no joke - that stuff is seriously hard to work with. You need four hands alternating between the spray with soapy water and the spray with diluted isopropyl alcohol.

Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Window
Car Land vehicle Wheel Vehicle Tire
Car Plant Vehicle Land vehicle Grille
 

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Heck yeah! Thank you! This may be a dumb question, but I'm assuming you just applied the tint to the outside of the front emblem cover? Have you noticed it affect any of the sensors in there?
I haven't noticed any difference. I recently drove in too close to my garage door and the automatic brake worked perfectly! I use cruise control on the freeway regularly and the auto-distance function hasn't changed.
 

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My own Bartman78 Chrome Delete is coming along. Three photos of my 2022 CX-30 Turbo Premium:
A. The day I got it (Tuesday, 5 days ago)
B. What it looked like this morning.
C. What it looks like tonight after reassembly with:
1. Vinyl-wrapped roof rails and chrome trim.
2. Light-smoke tinted headlights, turn-signals, and grill emblem (radar unit).
3. Paint Protection Film (PPF) on the front bumper and hood.

Man, PPF is no joke - that stuff is seriously hard to work with. You need four hands alternating between the spray with soapy water and the spray with diluted isopropyl alcohol.

View attachment 4894 View attachment 4896 View attachment 4897
How difficult was it to remove the front bumper? I've got to install a new chrome trim piece due to one being cracked, but I've got two options to wrap it: 1. Pay a guy I know $100-$150 to take the bumper off and install the new piece (after I wrap it) and then I'm going to wrap the other while he is installing the wrapped one. Or 2. I just do it all myself at the house and save the money. I'm just afraid I might break a clip or something removing the bumper. Is it easy enough to remove to warrant saving the cash?
 

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How difficult was it to remove the front bumper?
I don’t think removing the CX-30's front bumper is particularly difficult but that’s just me. To remove the entire front bumper, you'll start by removing the large fiber aero panel under the engine first. Then the smaller plastic aero panel in front of that under the radiator. Then a bunch of assorted push-pins and T-30 Torx bolts all around. I counted 80 fasteners total.

Release the black plastic trim at the front of each wheel well from the well liner by removing the four (4) push-pins on the wheel well liner in front of each tire. Note that three(3) of the four(4) push-pins have a tiny flush head. Their use is very counter-intuitive; they release by pushing the head IN. Once out, you reset the pin by pushing the pin all the way out. To reinstall, you'll just push the head into the middle, flush position. Again, each little pin has three positions; Ready (out), Engaged (flush), and Released (in). They're ingeniously simple but if you've never seen one before you might struggle. MOST of the push-pins used throughout are the normal kind where the head just pops up a little and you can remove the push-pin.

The front-most wheel trim pieces have a lip which goes UNDER the rear half of each wheel arch trim piece. Those larger (rearward) trim pieces have two(2) push pins in the top of each wheel well holding the their most forward edge flush to the fender. If you remove those two(2) push-pins, you can lift the rearward trim piece up so the lip on the forward piece can be easily pulled from underneath. To reassemble, the bumper and black plastic trim pieces together get press-fit in against the front fender. Then the rear black plastic trim piece is snugged up over the forward trim by re-inserting the plastic push-pins in the top of the wheel liner

The rear-most portion of the front bumper together with the wheel trim pops out from the front fender on each side just by yanking on it. (On each side, the bumper is only pressed into a squeeze fit in four (4) places along the panel edge; two (2) on the color bumper and two (2) on the black plastic trim piece.)

The biggest headache removing the bumper is the wire stay clips for the wiring (radar unit and turn-signals). They're meant to be installed easily but they're not positioned to be easily released from behind using needle-nose pliers. I found that a forked panel removal tool is the best way to slide-in under the clip and compress the two locking pins holding each wire stay clip in it's hole. The large, gray turn-signal connectors release by pushing a hard-to-feel button on the bottom of each connector.

Note: My photo shows the front wheel trim removed but the bumper on the car. You shouldn't do this unless absolutely necessary. The forward part of the wheel well trim is screwed onto the front bumper from behind. Don’t try to remove these pieces separately, just leave them attached to the front bumper as you remove the bumper from the car. (It IS physically possible to get a stubby screwdriver in behind the front bumper through each wheel well but the windshield washer fluid reservoir on the right side makes access to one of the three(3) mounting screws difficult.)

Personally, I wouldn’t trust a “friend” to do this job correctly without breaking anything. Take your time, take photos with your phone for reference and you should be okay. Rush and go in ham-fisted and plastic stuff is going to get broken.

Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Automotive tire


Hood Automotive lighting Vehicle Car Grille
 
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