Mazda CX‌-30 Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a AWD Astina CX30 and while the auto boot door is handy I’m just wondering what sort of drain on the battery it does ? This feature is not important to me and I would actually prefer if I didn’t have it . I use my boot at least 6 times a day and this is always with out motor running. Any thoughts ? Another thing which is probably just me is the auto hold , in the past when I’ve owned automatics at stop light I’ve always placed car in neutral so as the transmission is fighting the brake , the dealer said auto hold engaged the hand brake and to a non engineer like my self I still thought there must be some wear and tear from transmission and hand brake , can anyone with true knowledge explain this , cheers people , love this car
 

·
Registered
20 CX-30 AWD JBM Prem
Joined
·
146 Posts
I have a AWD Astina CX30 and while the auto boot door is handy I’m just wondering what sort of drain on the battery it does ? This feature is not important to me and I would actually prefer if I didn’t have it . I use my boot at least 6 times a day and this is always with out motor running. Any thoughts ?
A load test could be done on the boot/hatch circuit to determine the current draw to know for sure but I believe your concern is unnecessary. When operating the vehicle throughout the day, your battery will be kept in a full charge state.
From what I have seen so far and I could be wrong, the top trim level in the US is the only model with the auto door. It may be possible to replace the auto lift actuators with the lower trim level hydraulic (manual) lifts.

Another thing which is probably just me is the auto hold , in the past when I’ve owned automatics at stop light I’ve always placed car in neutral so as the transmission is fighting the brake , the dealer said auto hold engaged the hand brake and to a non engineer like my self I still thought there must be some wear and tear from transmission and hand brake , can anyone with true knowledge explain this , cheers people , love this car
It isn't necessary to place an automatic transmission in neutral when coming to a stop. The torque convertor "slips" when the vehicle is stationary so there isn't any load on the transmission.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
A load test could be done on the boot/hatch circuit to determine the current draw to know for sure but I believe your concern is unnecessary. When operating the vehicle throughout the day, your battery will be kept in a full charge state.
From what I have seen so far and I could be wrong, the top trim level in the US is the only model with the auto door. It may be possible to replace the auto lift actuators with the lower trim level hydraulic (manual) lifts.



It isn't necessary to place an automatic transmission in neutral when coming to a stop. The torque convertor "slips" when the vehicle is stationary so there isn't any load on the transmission.
Thank you very much for replying , it puts my mind at ease , as I said I’m no engineer so I appreciate the information , when I asked the salesman he didn’t really know
 

·
Registered
Preferred FWD / Deep Crystal Blue Mica
Joined
·
171 Posts
[QUOTEin the past when I’ve owned automatics at stop light I’ve always placed car in neutral so as the transmission is fighting the brake ][/QUOTE]
Your automatic transmission drivetrain was engineered to be left in drive while the engine is running and the car is at a state of rest at lights, and elsewhere.
Unless you're driving a manual trans car you're just putting more wear on the transmission and linkage by switching modes more often.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top