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2021 CX-30 Select AWD
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While searching for springs, came across this article and some pics of a lowered European+ model. North American models are jacked up another 1.1" so it won't look the same. I do like the lines when it sits lower. I also would prefer less body roll. This would help. Just my subjective opinion, I know some buy the 30 for the ground clearance it has.
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2021 CX-30 GT AWD - Machine Grey Metallic
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A bit too slammed for my taste, but that sort of thing is subjective. I prefer the stock European spring height. The North American height is too jacked up.
 

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2021 CX-30 GT AWD - Machine Grey Metallic
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Just buy the Mazda 3
The CX-30 isn't just a lifted Mazda 3 though. The 3 has a longer wheelbase, a shorter roofline, more overall length (by over 10 inches, which may cause fitment issues in a smaller garage), etc. So just saying "buy a Mazda 3" isn't a solution. If people find the look of the stock springs too tall, what exactly is wrong with a discussion on just dropping it?
 

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It looks so much better lowered, but as others say it defeats the purpose of an SUV and diminishes its main advantage over a 3. Might as well buy a 3 and not have to look at the cladding. So I did.
The CX-30 isn't just a lifted Mazda 3 though. The 3 has a longer wheelbase, a shorter roofline, more overall length (by over 10 inches, which may cause fitment issues in a smaller garage), etc. So just saying "buy a Mazda 3" isn't a solution. If people find the look of the stock springs too tall, what exactly is wrong with a discussion on just dropping it?
The more logical comparison is with the 3 hatch not the sedan. The hatch is only 2.6 inches longer. Sedan is too long for my taste too, being 1/2 ft. longer than my CX 5.
I do see your point that there are significant differences beyond a mere lifting that might sway one to choose one over the other.
But as you say nothing wrong with the discussion and letting every one weigh in. That's what we are here for. Vent and learn.

Please forgive for repeating myself but as I have said elsewhere, the Turbo 30 should have the Euro ride height for those who prefer the 30 over the 3 for whatever reason but place an emphasis on high performance and a slightly better aesthetic. The Euro version still has an extra 1.5 " ground clearance advantage over the 3 and 3" higher roof which might be just enough for some.
 

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My main reason for buying a CX30 in the UK over the new Mazda 3 is the better ground clearance / breakover angle to handle a steep drive! The 2014-19 Mazda 3 clears the drive as does the CX30 but the new Mazda 3 will bottom. Here are the comparative UK specs:

CarWheelbaseGround ClearanceBreakover Angle
Mazda 3272514011.73
Mazda CX30265518015.44
 

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2021 2.5 Turbo Premium Plus AWD
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Actually, while I like the looks of lowered cars, for a CUV or SUV, I don't at all. If I wanted it lowered, I would have gotten a Turbo 3 hatch and had that lowered. After having my '14 3 lowered in 2016, I am definitely over the low life and enjoying a much higher ride.
 

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..."enjoying a much higher ride." Like your hair! Sweet!
Absolutely!!! I am known as the #quiffqueen #rockstar and #superstar. All monikers given to me on Instagram. 😂😂. High hair, don’t care. 😜
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
That looks right. That's about what I want. I don't want to have it low like a sports car. That's not my goal. I already have a car that's lowered. I just want it to sit lower than the NA models, which looks like a normal CUV/SUV. They were clearly jacked up for North American market. Probably some polling or such combined with marketing decided that we, in NA, like big things so why not.

Although, to be honest, I do love the rendering someone did of CX30 lowered with Volk wheels, which I have on my other car. It looks more like a hatch than a CUV.

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G25 Touring - 2020 - Soul Red Crystal Metallic
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My neighbour has a ford focus and has to reverse it out of our awkward driveway with his wife walking and helping. No thank you to lowered cars. I'm not that keen on scraping the front bumper. It's such a relief not to have to worry so much about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'm not lowering it to where scraping is gonna be an issue. EU/Japs specs is what I want. Not sure if New Zealand/Australia has it jacked up like North America does. What's the hight spec there @Navii ?
 

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I'm not lowering it to where scraping is gonna be an issue. EU/Japs specs is what I want. Not sure if New Zealand/Australia has it jacked up like North America does. What's the hight spec there @Navii ?
Yes, we have it like the Europeans and Japanese. The US models are indeed a bit too much. Having limited experience driving in Hawaii and the American pick up trucks are very high, so maybe it's a taste thing.
 

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2021 CX-30 2.5L AWD Pearl White
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There is a lot more to doing this right than just changing the springs. It's also much more difficult to do properly when a vehicle has independent multilink rear suspension which (fortunately) the CX-30 does not have, so at least you have that going for you if you really insist on doing it. The through bolts for the frame to control arm bushings need to be tightened when the vehicle is at "ride height" If you simply change the springs and lower the vehicle without doing that you put a loaded stress as they essentially are trying to help the springs get the vehicle back to the correct ride height. This goes for the rear trailing arm suspension as well. Other things to consider is how does lowering the vehicle affect the angle called "scrub radius". As long as it doesn't take it to "0" it would have minimal impact that you would feel but it could be increasing loading of the tie rod ends at speed. If scrub radius drops close to 0 you will likely end up with a car that wanders. Most manufacturers today do not provide corrections for camber and caster, let alone SAI all of which could move from the ideal settings with the height change. You would need to rely on aftermarket solutions in that case to correct the alignment angles.

If enough vehicle owners show an interest in changing a given model's ride height aftermarket companies design and manufacture kits to do so which "might" include springs but typically rely on things like dropped/raised spindles, and modified control arms to prevent disturbing engineered suspension angles. This allows the ride height to be changed with fewer undesirable side effects.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for the info John. I knew about alignment's camber, caster and toe but haven't heard about scrub radius. Interesting read. I'm gonna pay a professional shop that deals with racing and modifying cars for a living. I'll bring up scrub radius and see what they say. I'll also post an update on the alignment. We'll see if lowering with H&R springs can keep the car within the specs without additional hardware.
 

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Thanks for the info John. I knew about alignment's camber, caster and toe but haven't heard about scrub radius. Interesting read. I'm gonna pay a professional shop that deals with racing and modifying cars for a living. I'll bring up scrub radius and see what they say. I'll also post an update on the alignment.
There are a lot of times someone starts changing tires/wheels, ride height without first measuring the scrub radius and then they end up with instability. It can happen only when accelerating, braking, or at cruise as mentioned in your article. The problem for the alignment technician is this angle quite often isn't published so we don't know what it was before the changes were made. That forces us to have to wing it and that can be a tedious process especially since it could require, make a change and then drive the car to see what the result is, then rinse and repeat. At least many of the modern alignment machines can make this measurement (Hunter Alignment Equipment calls it rolling force lever) Rolling force lever - Geometry - Wheels-InMotion but in the faster/faster-rush/rush world of auto repair relatively few technicians ever go in search of these kinds of measurements because they are losing money, don't get paid to do so when necessary.
 
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