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So you are telling everyone that cars that used road draft tubes instead of a PCV system didn't lose oil. Of course you used the word "appeared" so it's fair to say appearances can be deceiving. But anyway you are correct about one thing. In this day and age oil loss will soon be very nearly eliminated, of course getting rid of internal combustion engines altogether will be the primary reason for that.
I thought about this but couldn't resist. So, you're saying you'd be OK with buying a 35K car, having it
appear to consume NO OIL for 8K miles, then suddenly start consuming it at a noticeable rate? This wouldn't concern you in the least? You'd chalk it up to the normal operation of an internal combustion engine, think nothing of it and not worry about it? I'm sure you can see by looking through this thread that there aren't many people in the world making this kind of investment who would agree with you. Every person experiencing this SHOULD be contacting Mazda and opening a case. It's the only way this is going to be addressed. There's goodness in numbers. I've been Googling this issue for a few months and now I'm starting to see evidence of class actions against Mazda for this. Are all of these people mistaken?

Here's one: Valve Stem Seal Defect in 2021 Mazda Vehicles Linked to Excessive Oil Consumption, Class Action Claims.

Here's another: Mazda CX-30 Burning Oil | CX-30 Oil Consumption | Engine Problems
 
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I've been Googling this issue for a few months and now I'm starting to see evidence of class actions against Mazda for this. Are all of these people mistaken?

Here's one: Valve Stem Seal Defect in 2021 Mazda Vehicles Linked to Excessive Oil Consumption, Class Action Claims.
The key word in your question is "all". Some of them may have a car that has the valve stem seal that has torn and have "a cylinder" that has a problem, the majority of them do not. There would be other obvious symptoms associated to one cylinder in an engine having an oil consumption rate in excess of a quart in one thousand miles. Other than the generic list of symptoms in the class action lawsuit they did not list what I would expect to find in such a case. By not spelling out exactly what symptoms would be observed it is logical to conclude that either they don't have anyone who has and told them what they experienced for them to write it into the case, or "IF" they do have someone who actually has had a problem maybe they don't want to put that into the suit because of how easy that would make it to disqualify everyone else that has not.

Quotes from the lawsuit in bold. I could have included a lot more issues with it but there is only just so much time in a day.

Here, in addition to damages, Plaintiff seeks equitable relief, including a potential replacement of the Class Vehicles. The average value at issue would be the average of the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (“MSRP”) of the Case 8:22-cv-01055 Document 1 Filed 05/25/22 Page 4 of 6 Page ID #:4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 NELSON MULLINS RILEY & SCARBOROUGH LLP ATTORNEYS AT LAW LOS ANGELES 5 NOTICE OF REMOVAL base models included in the Class Vehicles, which is $25,221. See Ex. B, Kelley Blue Book (last visited May 24, 2022) and Ex. A, Compl. ¶ 58. Thus, to the extent replacement of the vehicles is a potential remedy as alleged in the Complaint, the value of that relief is $25,221 multiplied by the “thousands” of class members (which, at a minimum, would be 2,000 putative class members), or at least $25,221,000.

Well it's easy to see what they are really after. They don't actually care about the oil. They are looking for $25,221 x 2000 OR at least $25.2 Million....For themselves. If they get it, guess who ultimately pays for it?

Vehicles consume an excessive amount of engine oil in between oil changes and that “it is very likely that valve stem seal damage is causing oil to leak into the combustion chamber.”

Based on what? A TSB that alerted technicians that "some" engines might have "a damaged valve seal or seals" not all of them mind you just one out of a set on one random vehicle that they might encounter. I'll point out again, oil loss from something like that would be one of the symptoms, but NOT the only symptom. Any vehicle with reported usage not displaying all of the symptoms does not have a torn or damaged valve seal.

To date, Mazda has still not provided its dealerships with an adequate repair.

How many times does it have to be said, you cannot fix what isn't broken.

26. The valve stem seals in the Class Vehicles’ engines are supposed to prevent engine oil from contaminating the air/fuel mixture in the Class Vehicle’s engine’s combustion chamber and prevent intake and exhaust gases from contaminating the oil in the cylinder head and the rest of the engine.

Total nonsense, and this isn't the only example of it from the lawsuit. Stuff like this is what comes from a lack of education, not knowledge and experience. The sad part is they will either win the lawsuit or else settle out of court and the plaintiffs (and the plaintiff's lawyers) essentially hit the lottery and everyone else in the class might get a discount coupon for an oil change.
 

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The key word in your question is "all". Some of them may have a car that has the valve stem seal that has torn and have "a cylinder" that has a problem, the majority of them do not. There would be other obvious symptoms associated to one cylinder in an engine having an oil consumption rate in excess of a quart in one thousand miles. Other than the generic list of symptoms in the class action lawsuit they did not list what I would expect to find in such a case. By not spelling out exactly what symptoms would be observed it is logical to conclude that either they don't have anyone who has and told them what they experienced for them to write it into the case, or "IF" they do have someone who actually has had a problem maybe they don't want to put that into the suit because of how easy that would make it to disqualify everyone else that has not.

Quotes from the lawsuit in bold. I could have included a lot more issues with it but there is only just so much time in a day.

Here, in addition to damages, Plaintiff seeks equitable relief, including a potential replacement of the Class Vehicles. The average value at issue would be the average of the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (“MSRP”) of the Case 8:22-cv-01055 Document 1 Filed 05/25/22 Page 4 of 6 Page ID #:4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 NELSON MULLINS RILEY & SCARBOROUGH LLP ATTORNEYS AT LAW LOS ANGELES 5 NOTICE OF REMOVAL base models included in the Class Vehicles, which is $25,221. See Ex. B, Kelley Blue Book (last visited May 24, 2022) and Ex. A, Compl. ¶ 58. Thus, to the extent replacement of the vehicles is a potential remedy as alleged in the Complaint, the value of that relief is $25,221 multiplied by the “thousands” of class members (which, at a minimum, would be 2,000 putative class members), or at least $25,221,000.

Well it's easy to see what they are really after. They don't actually care about the oil. They are looking for $25,221 x 2000 OR at least $25.2 Million....For themselves. If they get it, guess who ultimately pays for it?

Vehicles consume an excessive amount of engine oil in between oil changes and that “it is very likely that valve stem seal damage is causing oil to leak into the combustion chamber.”

Based on what? A TSB that alerted technicians that "some" engines might have "a damaged valve seal or seals" not all of them mind you just one out of a set on one random vehicle that they might encounter. I'll point out again, oil loss from something like that would be one of the symptoms, but NOT the only symptom. Any vehicle with reported usage not displaying all of the symptoms does not have a torn or damaged valve seal.

To date, Mazda has still not provided its dealerships with an adequate repair.

How many times does it have to be said, you cannot fix what isn't broken.

26. The valve stem seals in the Class Vehicles’ engines are supposed to prevent engine oil from contaminating the air/fuel mixture in the Class Vehicle’s engine’s combustion chamber and prevent intake and exhaust gases from contaminating the oil in the cylinder head and the rest of the engine.

Total nonsense, and this isn't the only example of it from the lawsuit. Stuff like this is what comes from a lack of education, not knowledge and experience. The sad part is they will either win the lawsuit or else settle out of court and the plaintiffs (and the plaintiff's lawyers) essentially hit the lottery and everyone else in the class might get a discount coupon for an oil change.
You just don't get it. That's ok. I understand the lawyers are chasing the money. The people engaging these lawyers are chasing a solution. Those people probably don't have the background you do, but it doesn't take a rocket scientist to check oil levels regularly and observe the levels drop. Clearly not normal. "You cannot fix what isn't broken" indicates to me you clearly believe this entire thing is the product of someone's imagination and there really is no problem. So, there's nothing worth debating anymore.

To the rest of the folks having this issue.....Don't sit back and watch this happen. Take an active role and engage your service department and Mazda. The TSB has been out for a while, they know what the fix is, but it's probably going to be expensive in terms of recalls. The squeaky wheel gets the grease.
 
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Dang, I was ready to order a CX-30 Turbo but these issues have given me pause. If these motors are throwing low oil lights and requiring this much oil to be added under 60K miles, imagine what they could be like at 100K (I keep my cars a long time). This is not a rotary, and I am not checking/adding oil every week...that is silly.

My turbo DSM had the absolute piss driven out of it, and I never had oil consumption issues.
 

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Dang, I was ready to order a CX-30 Turbo but these issues have given me pause. If these motors are throwing low oil lights and requiring this much oil to be added under 60K miles, imagine what they could be like at 100K (I keep my cars a long time). This is not a rotary, and I am not checking/adding oil every week...that is silly.

My turbo DSM had the absolute piss driven out of it, and I never had oil consumption issues.
And that's why I got involved in these threads. The idea that an engine shouldn't use any oil at all is wrong. The only thing that has changed is the service intervals have been extended so what has always been normal just out of sight because of the shorter service intervals now is more apparent.

An engine that uses a quart of oil in 2000-4000 miles isn't in any danger of failing unless the driver/owner ignores properly caring for the engine and never checks the oil and adds some as required. Think this through, if we were still doing three month or three thousand mile services the only owners who would notice oil consumption would be the ones who's car genuinely has a problem. Today with service intervals that at the minimum are double that and stretch out as far as two years and 25,000 miles ( not a Mazda and the car holds ten quarts and has a filter that's about five times larger than ours) needing to check and add oil is normal. There are no automobile manufacturers building any engines that don't use some oil. There are reasons why specific vehicles might appear to not use any, that appearance however is an illusion.

Above you stated you don't want to have to check your oil every other week. Are you driving one to two thousand miles a week? If so then you need to lift the hood that often or pay someone to do it. If you drive around five hundred miles a week you'll probably find you will be lifting the hood once a month, maybe two. Remember these vehicles today have sensors that measure the oil level and would alert you if something suddenly changed and they do that with 75-80% of the oil remaining which is well before the oil level would be low enough to be a concern.

BTW. I only have two cars that have not been driven more than 150k miles (my 07 Mustang and my CX both of which aren't going anywhere in the foreseeable future) and have had five break the 300,000 mile mark, my CX should easily be the next car over 300k. Needing to add a quart of oil, maybe two between services of 10,000 miles is normal and is actually more likely to prevent something from going wrong.
 

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And that's why I got involved in these threads. The idea that an engine shouldn't use any oil at all is wrong. The only thing that has changed is the service intervals have been extended so what has always been normal just out of sight because of the shorter service intervals now is more apparent.

An engine that uses a quart of oil in 2000-4000 miles isn't in any danger of failing unless the driver/owner ignores properly caring for the engine and never checks the oil and adds some as required. Think this through, if we were still doing three month or three thousand mile services the only owners who would notice oil consumption would be the ones who's car genuinely has a problem. Today with service intervals that at the minimum are double that and stretch out as far as two years and 25,000 miles ( not a Mazda and the car holds ten quarts and has a filter that's about five times larger than ours) needing to check and add oil is normal. There are no automobile manufacturers building any engines that don't use some oil. There are reasons why specific vehicles might appear to not use any, that appearance however is an illusion.

Above you stated you don't want to have to check your oil every other week. Are you driving one to two thousand miles a week? If so then you need to lift the hood that often or pay someone to do it. If you drive around five hundred miles a week you'll probably find you will be lifting the hood once a month, maybe two. Remember these vehicles today have sensors that measure the oil level and would alert you if something suddenly changed and they do that with 75-80% of the oil remaining which is well before the oil level would be low enough to be a concern.

BTW. I only have two cars that have not been driven more than 150k miles (my 07 Mustang and my CX both of which aren't going anywhere in the foreseeable future) and have had five break the 300,000 mile mark, my CX should easily be the next car over 300k. Needing to add a quart of oil, maybe two between services of 10,000 miles is normal and is actually more likely to prevent something from going wrong.
 

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I am no automotive technician, but have been maintaining, modifying, and repairing vehicles for 25+ years. I never said some oil consumption is a problem. The LEVEL of oil consumption some of these turbo owners are already seeing is disconcerting (triggering low oil warning lights), and personally, I am not interested in having to constantly check and add oil to a brand new vehicle, that is not a confidence-inspiring ownership experience. I also don't want to deal with a failed cat because of excess oil consumption in a newer car. I've had all manner of vehicles, V8 F150, turbo DSM, base model Civic, MB CLK 430, RAV4, base Camry, Scion TC, and a V6 Tacoma and not one of them exhibited oil consumption issues with the exception of the Scion TC around 140,000 miles. Mazda clearly acknowledges there is an issue here (hence the TSB, and likely recall or design change in the future).
 

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I am no automotive technician, but have been maintaining, modifying, and repairing vehicles for 25+ years. I never said some oil consumption is a problem.
That may well be true but the thread is by and about owners who think there should be no consumption at all. The idea that engines don't use oil, or that if they do they are definitely heading for a failure are both myths.

The LEVEL of oil consumption some of these turbo owners are already seeing is disconcerting (triggering low oil warning lights),
The level of consumption is in most cases exaggerated, and even then still well within normal expectations. The "low oil light" controlled by an oil level system is the result of manufacturers learning that far too many owners never lift the hood and check any of the fluid levels.

I also don't want to deal with a failed cat because of excess oil consumption in a newer car.
One of the requirements for today's oils is to reduce SAPS in order to help protect the emissions system. That's why actually using a product that is approved for a vehicle's specs is so important.

I've had all manner of vehicles, V8 F150, turbo DSM, base model Civic, MB CLK 430, RAV4, base Camry, Scion TC, and a V6 Tacoma and not one of them exhibited oil consumption issues with the exception of the Scion TC around 140,000 miles. Mazda clearly acknowledges there is an issue here (hence the TSB, and likely recall or design change in the future).
The Scion and the RAV and some Camrys (depending on the year and options) have essentially the same engine (2AR-FE) and suffered the same failure (rings seizing in the grooves) which was a direct result of inferior North American API service specifications and Toyota going with the API minimum instead of requiring a more advanced product.
 

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I am no automotive technician, but have been maintaining, modifying, and repairing vehicles for 25+ years. I never said some oil consumption is a problem. The LEVEL of oil consumption some of these turbo owners are already seeing is disconcerting (triggering low oil warning lights), and personally, I am not interested in having to constantly check and add oil to a brand new vehicle, that is not a confidence-inspiring ownership experience. I also don't want to deal with a failed cat because of excess oil consumption in a newer car. I've had all manner of vehicles, V8 F150, turbo DSM, base model Civic, MB CLK 430, RAV4, base Camry, Scion TC, and a V6 Tacoma and not one of them exhibited oil consumption issues with the exception of the Scion TC around 140,000 miles. Mazda clearly acknowledges there is an issue here (hence the TSB, and likely recall or design change in the future).
If I'd have suspected this would be an issue with my car, I wouldn't have bought it. Period. I'm with you....look at the non-turbos or elsewhere until this is worked out. The rate of consumption is NOT exaggerated..... This is NOT "normal" nor "expected". I've driven all manner of vehicles too since around 1977 and HAVE NOT encountered this before. You are thinking about this the right way.
 

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You sir, have the last word. Everyone saying this isn't normal is wrong. Everyone worried about the long-term implications of an engine burning oil like gunk buildup and cat damage should just calm down. It's all good. We should accept this as normal and expected.....our 35K new car consuming oil at rates we've never seen in our driving lifetimes is normal. I'm converted.
 

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You sir, have the last word. Everyone saying this isn't normal is wrong. Everyone worried about the long-term implications of an engine burning oil like gunk buildup and cat damage should just calm down. It's all good. We should accept this as normal and expected.....our 35K new car consuming oil at rates we've never seen in our driving lifetimes is normal. I'm converted.
Lol, you'll have to forgive me for not believing you. You aren't the first person to ever think that ONLY worn out, broken or defective engines use oil. Herd mentality especially when flawed is difficult to overcome.

Maybe in time you will learn:

Today's oil specifications take into consideration the effects of the oil additive packages on the emissions system (aka catalytic convertors and the O2 and Air/fuel sensors). I could take this to another level and explain how changing oil too frequently and especially if the wrong oil is used can damage the emission system and the oil consumption rate has nothing at all to do with it. I'll save that for some day when I believe that you do accept that the usage of a quart in 2000 or more miles isn't necessarily a broken or defective engine.

If you are truly concerned about oil related issues, that's great. Learn about it from legitimate sources as we have had to do, not from anecdotal references. (aka so and so has owned XXX cars and he/she says)

No matter how hard you try to say that what is normal usage isn't, even today's engines have to lubricate the valves, the valve guides, the pistons, cylinder walls and rings. The only way to do that is to have a "controlled" amount of oil be sacrificed, which means some oil get's used and has to be replaced on a periodic basis. If an engine fails to use some oil to do that then wear and damage will occur and then you see the real kind of oil consumption issues that you are confusing with what is and always has been normal. BTW if you still don't believe that please tell us all exactly how you think the valves, valve guides, pistons, piston rings and cylinder walls are protected from wear.

REM. Your mileage will vary.
 

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From what I've read regarding "excessive oil consumption" statistics, only around 2% of new car are designed/built in such a way as to default-need oil added in between OEM recommended oil change intervals (almost all are certain "performance" German automaker models, though Subaru's has been on the list as well in some abundance). The data speaks for itself, as to what is normal & what is not normal for the overwhelming majority of consumer automobile makes/models being sold. There is a clear difference between normal oil consumption & excessive oil consumption, and no one is saying that oil consumption doesn't happen in all engines to one degree or another. Since I have never had an interest in owning German brands, or turbos in general, I have never had to worry about excessive oil consumption being an issue or likely becoming an issue. With turbo engines becoming more normal these days though even in commuter/utility, non-performance segments, perhaps more makes/models not previously on the list will have excessive oil consumption that require active user intervention between normal maintenance service visits.
 

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There is a clear difference between normal oil consumption & excessive oil consumption, and no one is saying that oil consumption doesn't happen in all engines to one degree or another.
Agreed to a point. The lawsuit mentioned above is easily based on usage that does not indicate a problem. If everyone was still doing 3000 mile oil changes they would never have seen a warning nor had a clue it was occurring. The fact that services are being extended well beyond what was being done as little as five to ten years ago is making normal usage a factor in caring for the vehicles.
With turbo engines becoming more normal these days though even in commuter/utility, non-performance segments, perhaps more will have excessive oil consumption that require active intervention between normal maintenance service visits.
This is correct and it's across just about every make and model. These debates about oil consumption and what is normal or not have been going on for decades and will likely continue until all of the ICEs are gone. (ICE = internal combustion engine)
 

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Yay me. First "low engine oil" message today. I was watching it incrementally lower over the past few weeks and wondered when the alert would trigger. It triggered right at halfway between the upper and lower dot on the dipstick. But this is GREAT news, right? They set the trigger so it would still be safe, I guess. Luckily......knowing what a pleasant and "normal" experience this would be (and nothing to worry about, by the way), I kept a bottle of oil in the back of the car. You know, like people used to do in the 50's????? Anyway, I put in a half of a quart and I'm just below the full dot again. This means it used 1/2 a quart in 2500 miles. PERFECTLY NORMAL THESE DAYS as I'm to understand it now. Shoot, I'll just carry a case in the back of the car and won't really become concerned until it starts using a quart every 1,000 miles.....NOT.

I also lubed the hinges on the hood......I'm sure I'll be wearing those thin opening and closing the hood while I check my oil multiple times a week. I sort of have to since I'm not sure just how much this will increase.

Time to visit the dealer, get it on record, contact corporate and open a case there, and perhaps lawyer up. I'm not really quiet when I'm unhappy, especially where about $35,000 is concerned.
 

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Yay me. First "low engine oil" message today. I was watching it incrementally lower over the past few weeks and wondered when the alert would trigger. It triggered right at halfway between the upper and lower dot on the dipstick. But this is GREAT news, right? They set the trigger so it would still be safe, I guess. Luckily......knowing what a pleasant and "normal" experience this would be (and nothing to worry about, by the way), I kept a bottle of oil in the back of the car. You know, like people used to do in the 50's????? Anyway, I put in a half of a quart and I'm just below the full dot again. This means it used 1/2 a quart in 2500 miles. PERFECTLY NORMAL THESE DAYS as I'm to understand it now. Shoot, I'll just carry a case in the back of the car and won't really become concerned until it starts using a quart every 1,000 miles.....NOT.

I also lubed the hinges on the hood......I'm sure I'll be wearing those thin opening and closing the hood while I check my oil multiple times a week. I sort of have to since I'm not sure just how much this will increase.

Time to visit the dealer, get it on record, contact corporate and open a case there, and perhaps lawyer up. I'm not really quiet when I'm unhappy, especially where about $35,000 is concerned.
I'm sorry to hear it. The more people bring this issue up and have it documented, the more efficiently Mazda will address the issue (I hope).
 

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I'm sorry to hear it. The more people bring this issue up and have it documented, the more efficiently Mazda will address the issue (I hope).
Thank you. It's EXTREMELY frustrating in this day and age where all of this has been taken care of for decades.... And, it completely takes away the pleasure of having a new vehicle, having to worry about this crap. Trips to the dealer, endless phone calls and hassles that just shouldn't be. I'm too old for this.
 

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I thought about this but couldn't resist. So, you're saying you'd be OK with buying a 35K car, having it
appear to consume NO OIL for 8K miles, then suddenly start consuming it at a noticeable rate? This wouldn't concern you in the least? You'd chalk it up to the normal operation of an internal combustion engine, think nothing of it and not worry about it? I'm sure you can see by looking through this thread that there aren't many people in the world making this kind of investment who would agree with you. Every person experiencing this SHOULD be contacting Mazda and opening a case. It's the only way this is going to be addressed. There's goodness in numbers. I've been Googling this issue for a few months and now I'm starting to see evidence of class actions against Mazda for this. Are all of these people mistaken?

Here's one: Valve Stem Seal Defect in 2021 Mazda Vehicles Linked to Excessive Oil Consumption, Class Action Claims.

Here's another: Mazda CX-30 Burning Oil | CX-30 Oil Consumption | Engine Problems
You seem to think it's not possible for this to happen on a 35k car, LOL. So if a car was 20k and "not expensive" as you say, that would be fine. Well, Audi had huge oil consumption issues back 10+ years ago and their cars were 50k+. The fact is every engine consumes oil, it's just how much is consumed within the mileage. Personally, I've only had to add oil to one car between oil changes, and that was 2013 Audi A4.
And that's why I got involved in these threads. The idea that an engine shouldn't use any oil at all is wrong. The only thing that has changed is the service intervals have been extended so what has always been normal just out of sight because of the shorter service intervals now is more apparent.

An engine that uses a quart of oil in 2000-4000 miles isn't in any danger of failing unless the driver/owner ignores properly caring for the engine and never checks the oil and adds some as required. Think this through, if we were still doing three month or three thousand mile services the only owners who would notice oil consumption would be the ones who's car genuinely has a problem. Today with service intervals that at the minimum are double that and stretch out as far as two years and 25,000 miles ( not a Mazda and the car holds ten quarts and has a filter that's about five times larger than ours) needing to check and add oil is normal. There are no automobile manufacturers building any engines that don't use some oil. There are reasons why specific vehicles might appear to not use any, that appearance however is an illusion.

Above you stated you don't want to have to check your oil every other week. Are you driving one to two thousand miles a week? If so then you need to lift the hood that often or pay someone to do it. If you drive around five hundred miles a week you'll probably find you will be lifting the hood once a month, maybe two. Remember these vehicles today have sensors that measure the oil level and would alert you if something suddenly changed and they do that with 75-80% of the oil remaining which is well before the oil level would be low enough to be a concern.

BTW. I only have two cars that have not been driven more than 150k miles (my 07 Mustang and my CX both of which aren't going anywhere in the foreseeable future) and have had five break the 300,000 mile mark, my CX should easily be the next car over 300k. Needing to add a quart of oil, maybe two between services of 10,000 miles is normal and is actually more likely to prevent something from going wrong.
You raise some logical valid points in general. Unfortunately, owners (generally) do not maintain their vehicles properly. I have looked at dozen or so used cars over the past few years and not one had maintenance done on time within mileage, even on BMW vehicles where the service was free (or included in the purchase price).

I've only had to add oil between oil changes in one vehicle over 30+ years, and it was twice, on an 2013 Audi A4 (which was not included in the oil consumption issues).

As for my Mazda CX-30, I get oil changes every 6 months (or less than 8000 kms (5000 miles)) so hopefully I won't have to add oil, I just don't drive enough during that time. In my 10 months of ownership, I'm close to 8000 kms, so I haven't checked the oil, it just not something I typically do on a regular basis.

But I was watching Motormouth (YouTube) auto journalist live show, and 1 person in the chat had bought a new CX-30 turbo and had to add 1 litre/1 quart after his first 2000 kms. I would consider this abnormal but the dealer said it was normal, it certainly is not, otherwise it would happen to almost all CX-30's.
 
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