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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We drove our CX-30 off the lot with a full tank and haven't filled it up yet. I assume they would use premium to show off the performance. I'm wondering if the performance boost from using premium (227 to 250 hp) is very noticable when entering a freeway and passing cars? Which do most turbo drivers use? Cost aside, are there any mechanical issues with long term use of premium?
 

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2021 Mazda CX-30 AWD Turbo Premiun, Soul Red
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It will run fine on regular but if you want optimum performance, then use premium.
It will run fine on mid-grade also.
The computer will adjust to the regular, mid-grade or premium.
I use premium for maximum performance but not sure I would notice a difference if I used regular.
 

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2021 Mazda MX-30 Turbo
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The higher the octane, the slower the fuel burns, so the timing can be advanced a bit more without risk of detonation, or "ping". This gives you the extra 25 horsepower with Premium fuel. Running regular STILL gets me in trouble driving TOO DAMN FAST!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I guess I'll have to try both. I hadn't thought about a computer making adjustments with these newfangled cars.
If I was a car salesman/dealership owner, I'd use premium, it seems like a small investment to impress a buyer for the potential payoff. Thanks all.
 

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2021 CX-30 GS AWD 2021 CX-30 GS FWD
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I had a 2018 Mazda6 Turbo and did 53kkms in it. I mostly used regular fuel and I agree that for regular street driving there was no real difference that my butt dyno detected. This engine makes the same torque regardless of fuel type maybe that is why it is hard to detect any difference with fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I just filled it up for the first time, I bought premium, I'll buy regular next time. Whatever kind of gas was in it, it made my butt dyno-happy. Maybe it's no big deal for most of you, but it's the most powerful car I've ever owned and I'm loving it. The first tank was only 20mpg with at least a quarter of the mileage driven on the highway. I guess it's the old, 'You play - You pay'.
 

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2022 CX-30 Turbo Premium Plus
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For my Turbo CX-30, I tried a full tank of 93 octane then switched back to 87 since I could not tell a difference in my standard real world driving. Fast is fast in my opinion 😉.

Key1
 

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2021 CX-30 S 2.5L white/black
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It's somewhere around 99.83% certainty the dealer put in regular. Dealerships generally have one tank and one pump to use on all vehicles and it contains regular. Exceptions are made with some cars, like the Mitsubishi Evolution VII at the dealership I worked at. I was sent to drive it to Shell and put in 5 gallons of premium. But for one like the CX-30 that doesn't require premium they're going to use the regular they have behind the service bays.

The question is probably do you want to spend 10-15% more money on 100% of your fuel to have the extra HP for the 1% or less driving where you could actually possibly use the extra power. Not the 17% or 23% or whatever when you are probably driving beyond what you should be anyway. The actual 1% or less when you legitimately might need/use it. Or do you want to save 15% or whatever on 100% of your driving and still have more than enough power available.

I ask because I have the stock S with 186HP and it is plenty. YMMV
 

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In the minority here, but I notice a substantial difference and so I use 93. I've heard hearsay that this also means less 'buildup' in the engine overtime (no idea if that's true.) I do know that according to coleman--one of the engineers behind this car--93 is only required for full performance in warm weather. In cold temperatures 91 and even 87 octane can give the full 250hp if the engine doesn't sense any knock.
 

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2022 CX-30 Turbo Premium Plus
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In the minority here, but I notice a substantial difference and so I use 93. I've heard hearsay that this also means less 'buildup' in the engine overtime (no idea if that's true.) I do know that according to coleman--one of the engineers behind this car--93 is only required for full performance in warm weather. In cold temperatures 91 and even 87 octane can give the full 250hp if the engine doesn't sense any knock.
That's interesting about the better performance in the summer.... Next month when it really warms up here I think I'll try a tank of 93 octane again and see if I can tell the difference 😉.
Key1
 

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We drove our CX-30 off the lot with a full tank and haven't filled it up yet. I assume they would use premium to show off the performance. I'm wondering if the performance boost from using premium (227 to 250 hp) is very noticable when entering a freeway and passing cars? Which do most turbo drivers use? Cost aside, are there any mechanical issues with long term use of premium?
I have only used regular 87 octane and I never bother to put it in sport mode, it is quick as is.
 

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2021 CX30 Turbo Premium
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93, obvious difference. Never run sports mode because that just changes shift timing doesn't add any power.... To the people who fill up with 93 then go back... consider the ECU needs to see you're running 93.... and you are mixing gas... it takes multiple tanks to swap from 87 to 93.
 

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CX-30 GT Turbo Polymetal Gray
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Per Mazda, I've heard that 87 and 93 does the same power up to 4000rpm, that's why most people don't feel a difference.
That said, from the grapevine I've heard that running 87 adds around 1 second to the 0-60mph, so if the CX-30 turbo does 5.8sec on 93 then it will do around 6.6 to 6.8 sec on 87.

No source on this of course : )
 

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2022 Mazda CX-30 Turbo Premium Soul Red
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Heat and temperature affects it a lot too. If you live in the northeast, you can get 93-like performance on cold days on 87. 93 is much more noticeable in the summertime.
 

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In the minority here, but I notice a substantial difference and so I use 93. I've heard hearsay that this also means less 'buildup' in the engine overtime (no idea if that's true.)
You'd have to do a blind test to confirm that you really can tell a difference between octane levels. Otherwise, the placebo effect is massive and has to be accounted for in making a realistic determination. My cars "feel" faster after I change the oil or just apply wax.

All direct-injection engines have an issue with carbon build-up on the intake valves. A few manufacturers have come out with "hybrid" injection systems - direct-injection for ultimate fuel economy AND port injection to maintain intake valve performance (exhaust valves get hot enough to effectively self-clean). It's difficult to imagine that 93-octane fuel would create less intake valve carbon build-up vs 87-octane fuel (unless Mazda "S-VVT" variable valve timing created such a difference). The information I've found about S-VVT says that valve timing is optimized for engine RPM and load. I haven't found anything to indicate that S-VVT changes with fuel octane. Also, SkyActiv-G engines position the intake valves within the head so the valves both get hotter, and get hot faster after engine start-up, as a means to reduce carbon build-up.

On the other hand, gasoline detergent additives can make a difference in many engines. For instance, "Techron" is a patented fuel additive developed by Chevron Corporation. Techron contains a polyether amine-based detergent, which is purported to dissolve deposits in automotive engines and prevent them from building up. Chevron released Techron as a fuel additive in 1981, and later began including it in all of their gasoline products in 1995 (in all Chevron, Texaco and Caltex gasolines). It is also available as a bottled concentrate so, if you don't use Chevron/Texaco/Caltex gasolines, you can still add Techron yourself. Unfortunately, it's doubtful that Techron will do anything to clean intake valves in a direct-injection engine like Mazda's SkyActiv-G.
 
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